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WHITE PAPER ”Business Energy Tax Reform”

By Briony Fitzsimons, Principal Consultant CBx

This paper was put together following the CBx evening event in April 2016, to describe and explain the announced changes to the energy tax landscape. On 16th March 2016, the Chancellor set out plans for a major reorganisation of the UK business carbon tax system, as part of the 2016 Budget. This included abolishing the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) after the 2018-19 compliance year, and compensating for the revenue thus lost through an increase in the Climate Change Levy (CCL). At the “Business Energy Tax Reform” event on 14th April, members of the built environment industry met to consider the implications.

With special thanks to our fantastic panel of experts; Patrick Brown, of British Property Federation, Gary Shanahan, of Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Sunil Shah, of Acclaro Advisory, and Anna Menezes, of Tesco.

Business Energy Tax Reform

Click on the thumbnail to download a one-page executive summary

To access our full white paper online please click on the button below. If you would like to download a hard copy of our whitepaper, there is an additional charge of £25.00 for non-paying members. Please get in contact with us at info@cbxchange.org and specify the title of the whitepapers you wish to purchase.

 

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WHITE PAPER ”Heat Technology Innovations: Can it lead to a low Carbon future?”

By Patrick Elwell, Sustainability Analyst CBx

This paper was put together following the CBx evening event in March 2016, which explored innovations in heat technology. In the UK, 44% of energy use goes into space heating and hot water, with the energy source for heating predominantly being fossil fuels. In order for the UK to reach its carbon targets, there must be a shift from fossil fuel energy sources to low carbon sources. One possible solution to assist the UK with this is through district heating. However, at present, the UK has one of the lowest participation in such schemes in Europe.

This paper explores the innovations being made within the industry and specifically examines heat technology for district heating. The outcome of the paper is to show how technology and trends may increase the penetration of heat networks in the UK and the rest of Europe, and ultimately lead to a more sustainable, low carbon future.

With special thanks to our fantastic panel of experts; John Thompson, CEO at Environmental Treatment Concepts Ltd; Gareth Jones, Director at Guru Systems Limited; Colin Ashford, Chair of CIBSE AM15: Biomass heating; and Ashley Bateson, Partner & Head of Sustainability at Hoare Lea.

Untitled

Click on the thumbnail to download a one-page executive summary

To access our full white paper online please click on the button below. If you would like to download a hard copy of our whitepaper, there is an additional charge of £25.00 for non-paying members. Please get in contact with us at info@cbxchange.org and specify the title of the whitepapers you wish to purchase.

 

Click  to preview  the full White Paper  report

 

BLOG: Low Carbon Heat Networks

Low Carbon Heat Networks

Patrick Elwell

By Patrick Elwell, Sustainability Analyst at CBx

Have you ever bought something expensive and then hidden it away to never be used again? Perhaps you have if you’re a classic car enthusiast, but for the majority of us the idea would seem absurd. Well, this is happening with low carbon heat networks. The installation of capital-intensive technologies is common amongst stakeholders to generate energy savings and reduce carbon emissions. However, all too often these networks fail to live up to the performance they were designed to achieve. Countless biomass and CHP installations are installed and then mothballed due to a fundamental lack of understanding of the technology purchased. For those that applied for RHI support between 2011 and 2016, 5% of applications were either rejected, failed or cancelled. That’s over 3,000 applications and not counting those that didn’t apply in the first place.

The issue does not lie with the technology per se. On paper, low carbon technology shows fantastic gains in “source efficiency” through onsite generation which generally results in a positive return on investment made through energy savings. But that’s on paper. In reality, low carbon technology can face a plethora of issues if not managed from the get-go. Issues ranging from design, installation, commissioning and operation can create ripples across the industry which leave end-users struggling to understand their new kit and gives the technology a bad reputation.

Work has been done to help stakeholders understand their systems better; a lot of this information is written about getting new systems working. However, this work generally remains in the author’s respected industry and rarely does the knowledge transfer easily across other sectors. The consequences of this can lead to confused communication and an inward-looking culture where short term goals become the norm. CBx is focussed on bridging this gap with its Low Carbon Heat Network project. The project will not look at recreating information that already exists but instead look at existing networks and identify barriers that limit their operating performance. This is an area that DECC has recognised and views it as a means to contributing towards its heat targets, which is to have 12% of total heat demand to come from renewables in 2020.

Heat networks have long been recognised by the UK government as an opportunity to meet its carbon targets. Currently, only 2% of the heat supplied in the UK comes from heat networks. As one of the lowest participants in Europe for district heating, there is certainly room for improvement. However, there appears to be an information gap between invested parties that all too often leads to confusion about how optimise a heat network’s operation. As a result, many networks across the UK are being mothballed, which is a huge blow to the UK Government’s carbon targets. The proposed CBx project will create an evidence-based user guide which is transparent and accessible. The overall aim is to help bring back online more heat networks and so mitigate the effects of traditional carbon-based energy, thus lessening the UK’s contribution to climate change.

With support from Skanska, Wilmot Dixon, BuroHapphold and Catalyst Housing, the CBx Low Carbon Heat Network project is aimed at stakeholders that are real users of heat networks and want to overcome some of the barriers they may have faced during their network’s life time. Themes such as education, finance, operation and risk management are salient among nonperforming networks. By comparing these themes with real examples, CBx will be able to start dismantling the walls that divide the industry and create a more collaborative environment.

If you would to discuss the project in more detail, or if you might like to contribute your network as an example, please contact Patrick on info@cbxchange.com, who will be very happy to speak with you.

 

 

 

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